What To Do With a Bad Employee

corrective action, Termination

Businesses take a big risk when hiring employees of different experiences and personality types, so when the team has a toxic employee, the business and everything related to the business can be in danger.  Even when the bad or toxic employee is known, it can be difficult trying to remold them into an engaged and happy employee so here’s what to do with a bad employee.

What To Do With a Bad Employee

  1. Assess the situation.  Before you can make any judgments on the employee, you need to do some research on the employee’s behavior and work performance.  You’ll want to dig into all the past and current performance metrics, any employee surveys or feedback, and review notes from past meetings. As you start to better understand how the employee turned bad or toxic, check in with HR to get some guidance on what additional intel you’d need to properly understand the situation.
  2. Determine if corrective action is needed.  Once you’ve assessed the situation, you’ll want to figure out if taking corrective action with the employee is an option.  Typically, when you do not have past documentation of any performance or behavioral issues, corrective action with help both you and the business. Disciplining employees by using a corrective action plan can help kickstart the process of trying to rehabilitate the employee.
  3. Check in with HR.  Depending on your organization’s policies and the employee issue, it may be difficult to figure out which course of action to take.  HR is your best resource to help you make the right decisions and can help determine if corrective action or termination is the best course of action.
  4. Openly communicate with the employee.  Once you’ve gone through the first three steps, it’s time to have a conversation with the employee to understand their perspective.  This will help clarify any potential issues and can help you decide if any corrective action should be taken. 
  5. Consider termination.  If everything has been researched, communication has happened between the employee and HR, and the employee continues to be bad or toxic, then firing the employee becomes a real option. Discuss with HR if you’re considering firing the employee so you can ensure the business stays protected if the employee needs to be terminated. 

How to Train Managers on Termination

Termination

As an HR team, you have a tall order balancing between recruiting, talent development, and enforcing company policy.  And while most managers do well in day-to-day management of their employees, when it comes to firing them, they could feel very lost. It’s important to train all managers in tasks and processes that help mitigate risk to the company, especially on terminating employees. 

Training Managers on Employee Termination

  1. The importance of training.  The training helps to protect the business and provide the right tools to ensure the process is standardized and done the same across the company.  If the process is followed correctly and is done the same for every employee that’s fired, then it significantly decreases risk of a wrongful termination lawsuit related to being treated unfairly and creates less confusion amongst managers about what the right process is.
  2. The most important points to focus on.  There are a handful of topics that managers need to understand before terminations can happen. 
    • Managers need to have a good understanding of documentation and what the corrective action process is.  This helps ensure they understand there’s a whole set of steps to follow before even considering terminating an employee.
    • Managers also need to be able to objectively articulate why the employee is to be terminated.  There are main categories of reasons, with the basics including unsatisfactory performance, a change in organizational structure, and direct misconduct. They need to understand if they even have the authority to fire an employee.
    • The process and tools used to get a termination approved. It’s helpful to walk managers through an example case scenario to ensure they understand.
    • How to conduct a termination meeting is vital to ensure the manager does not say anything that could endanger the company.  Make sure to avoid small talk, remain calm, and try to direct the meeting in an organized manner to avoid any misleading communication. 
  3. Have reference guides available.  Managers just learned a lot of new information. It’s important to have the information used in the training available and easily accessible. Depending on the employees they’re responsible for, the need to terminate an employee could happen their first month or after their first year.
  4. Don’t be afraid to enforce the rules.  Managers represent the company and are the first line of defense against any possible employee issues that can pose a risk to the business. If a manager is not following the policy the HR team has set forth, they’ll need corrective action, or else they may not be fit to be a manager with direct reports. At the end of the day, the business needs to be protected before it can do anything else (especially grow revenue).

Bambee gives Managers and HR Teams the right tools to fire an employee the right way without worry about any additional training. Best-practice guides and tips are available at every step to ensure each Manager follows the same process the right way every time. Find out more at www.bambee.com.

-The Bambee Team